Categories
Links

Lesbian Pulp Fiction, Mayonnaise, and JJ Hensley

The J.J. Hensley’s Trevor Galloway Thriller series continues with “The Better of the Bad” (Down & Out Books; 2020). I’m such a big fan of this series, I’ve ordered my own paperback text unseen.

“We All Live in Don DeLillo’s World. He’s Confused by It Too” as The New York Times.

James Crumley‘s Unofficial Rules for Writing.

Chloe Maveal on lesbian pulp fiction at CrimeReads.

“Mayonnaise, The Bastard” by Andrew Davie at Shotgun Honey.

New fiction by Jim Woessner at Close to the Bone.

Monday kicked off Bishop Rider Week at Punk Noir Magazine with the short story, “Fire in the Hole” by Beau Johnson.

Categories
Links

Bear Shifting, Heavy Drinking, and Andrew Davie

“Dig Two Graves” by Andrew Davie is now out (Close to the Bone; 2020).

No one talks about the consequences of a bear shifter romance.

Ivy Pachoda interviews Smith Henderson and John March Smith, authors “Make Them Cry” (Ecco; 2020).

Review of “Truth Lies Bleeding” by Tony Black (Stark House Press; 2020/2011) at Bookgasm.

Review of “Recursion” by Blake Crouch (Crown; 2019) at Do Some Damage.

“Error Printer Jam”, a short story, by Calen MacDonald.

Right Place, Wrong Time, a short story, by Paul D. Brazill

Categories
Incident Report

Incident Report No. 94

Way too many links. Let’s give y’all a headstart.


Articles

A nice article about the importance of indie publishers by Matt Keyes.

The 1951 adaptation of Native Son (starring Richard Wright) is a darkly satiric noir.

Bilingual authors are challenging the practice of italicizing non-English words.

Poetry is coming to Close to the Bone at the end of the month.

Dana King on the (un)importance of backstory.

“The Children of the Appalachians” by Rebecca Bengal at The Paris Review.

Raymond Chandler’s letters to a younger crime writer offer a revealing—and often ugly—glimpse into his later years.

Colman Keane continues his deep dive into the works of Ed Gorman.

“The Strange History of Mickey Spillane and New Zealand’s ‘Jukebox Killer’ by Andrew Nette at CrimeReads.

The Stiletto Gumshoe looks at two recent stories about sex in crime fiction.

Interview with M. E. Browning, author of “Shadow Ridge” (Crooked Lane Books; 2020).

The First Two Pages: “Schemes in the Dark” by Jennifer Berg at Art Taylor’s blog.

Why Bryn Greenwood is proud to have her books called crime fiction.

An introduction to the latest volume of “Coast to Coast Noir” (Down and Out Books; 2020) from one of the editors, Paul D. Marks.

“Contextual Cues for Predatory Targeting: Pattern repetition improves the speed and efficiency of victimizing” by Katherine Ramsland, PhD at The Crime Fiction Writer’s Blog.


Book Reviews

Review of “Find The Dead” by Peter James (Macmillan UK; 2020) at The Rap Sheet.

Review of “An Obscure Road to Hollywood: Scoundrels and Spitballers- Writers and Hollywood in the 1930s” by Philippe Garnier (Black Pool Productions; 2020)

Review of “The Six” by Luca Veste (Simon & Schuster UK; 2020)

Review of “Lost Writings” by Franz Kafka, translated by Michael Hofmann (New Directions; 2020).

Review of “Chesapeake Crimes:Invitation to Murder” edited by Donna Andrews, Barb Goffman & Marcia Talley (Wildside Press; 2020) at BOLO Books.

Review of “The Unidentified: Mythical Monsters, Alien Encounters, and Our Obsession with the Unexplained” by Colin Dickey (Viking; 2020).

Review of “To Cook a Bear” by Mikael Niemi (MacLehose Press; 2020).

Review of “Winter Counts” by David Heska Wanbli Weiden (Ecco; 2020) at Lesa’s Book Critiques.

Review of “The Searcher” by Tana French at NPR.

My review of “Third Degree” by Ross Klavan, Tim O’Mara, and Charles Salzberg (Down and Out Books; 2020).

Review of “No Strings” by Mark Safranko (2012) at Col’s Criminal Library.

Review of “Touchfeather” by Jimmy Sangster (1968).

Review of “Dear Child” by Romy Hausmann (Flatiron Books; 2020)

Review of “21 Immortals: Inspector Mislan and the Yee Sang Murders” by Rozlan Mohd Noor (Arcade Crimewise; 2020) at Los Angeles Review of Books.

Review of “Kiss Her Goodbye” by Wade Miller (1956) at The Dark Time.

Review of “Only the Women Are Burning” by Nancy Burke (Apprentice House; 2020)

Review of “Dig 2 Graves” by Andrew Davie (Close to the Bone; 2020) at NewRetroWave.

Review of S.A. Cosby’s “Blacktop Wasteland” (Flatiron Books; 2020) at Pulp Curry.

Review of “Innocent or Guilty?” by A.M. Taylor (One More Chapter; 2019).

Review of “The Man in the White Linen Suit” by David Handler (William Morrow; 2019).

Review of “Devil May Carer” and “Sinner Take All” by Wade Miller (Stark House Press; 2020, originally published in 1950 and 1960).

Review of “The Mystery of the Cowboy Summit” by Darryle Purcell (2020) at Pulp Fiction Reviews.

Review of “Deception by Gaslight” by Kate Belli (Crooked Lane Books; 2020)

Review of “Burn You Twice” by Mary Burton (Montlake; 2020)


Fiction and Poetry

New fiction by Catherine A. Kelley at Every Day Fiction.

New poetry by Michael Minassian.

New fiction by Erika Veurink at Cheap Pop.

New flash fiction by J.B. Stevens at Mystery Tribune.

New short fiction by Judith Present.

New poetry by Mike James.

New fiction by Joe Taylor at The Rye Whiskey Review.

New fiction by H.E. Vogl at Every Day Fiction.

New fiction by Dana Liebelson at Cheap Pop.

“card shop carl”, a poem by John Grochalski.

Short fiction by Sebnem Sanders.

Flash fiction by Paul Garrett.

Poem by Jay Passer.

New flash fiction by A.G. Hilton at Pulp Modern.

Short fiction by Nathan Pettigrew at Bristol Noir.

“The Only Time Fun Comes Before Work is in the Dictionary” by Andrew Davie, a short story, at The Daily Drunk.

New fiction from Nikki Dolson at TOUGH

Poetry by Ian Lewis Copestick at Punk Noir Magazine

“Stakes For Sea Creatures Replaced By Something New” by Kristin Garth, a poem at Punk Noir Magazine

New poetry by Giovanni Mangiante at The Rye Whiskey Review

A new poem by Tom Barlow at The Five-Two.

Short fiction by Sean Thor Conroe at Vol. 1 Brooklyn.

New fiction by Darrent Sant at Close To The Bone.

Poetry by Ben Newell.

New poems from Mark McConville at Punk Noir Magazine.

Short fiction by Paul D. Brazill.


Podcasts and Other Media

Gytha Lodage interviewed on Two Crime Writers And A Microphone.

Interview with Dean Koontz at Otherppl.

Via Punk Noir Magazine, “The Disembodied Parts”, a podcast by Pablo D’Stair.

Helping Writers Become Authors: Ep. 522: The Link Between Your Story’s First Plot Point and Third Plot Point

K.M. Weiland appears on The Creative Penn or is it the other way around?

Writing Excuses on “Researching for Writing the Other”.

Murder in a Small Canadian Town with J.G. Toews on It’s a Mystery.

Illustrations by Geraldine Theurot.

Billy Strings on World Cafe.

Craig Sisterson on fifteen great crime shows to watch at Crime Fiction Lover.

Kronos Quartet Blends Words, Music, and Magic to Celebrate Pete Seeger at No Depression.

Pulp illustrations by Glen Orbik.

“Modern Western Films Written Better Than Ever” by David Cranmer at LitReactor.

Paul Matts reviews the various artist album “Sir J.J. Special: J.J. Johnson’s Ska and Rock Productions 1966-1968” at We Are Cult.

Big Lonely City photography series continues.

Pulp illustrations by the Unknown at The Stiletto Gumshoe.

Film Review of “Female Human Animal” (2018) at Punk Noir Magazine.

Categories
Books

Third Degree by Ross Klavan, Tim O’Mara, and Charles Salzberg

Anthologies are always tough to pull off. The biggest difficulty is navigating the space between the different voices – this occurs whether one reads a short story anthology or an anthology of novellas such as “Third Degree: 3 Authors, 3 Novellas” by Ross Klavan, Tim O’Mara, and Charles Salzberg (Down & Out Books; 2020). Add to that that a novella itself is a difficult beast – does it have the room of a novel or the urgency of a short story? I lean toward the latter. Oddly, all three novellas – “Cut Loose All Those Who Drag You Down” by Ross Klavan, “Beaned’ by Tim O’Mara, and “The Fifth Column” by Charles Salzberg – are told in the first person which forced me to have an extended paused between readings, sort of a palate cleanser between voices.

Klavan’s novella, which was my favorite of the three, is told by a narrator who seemingly can’t keep a coherent thread going. Klavan’s seemingly disjointed tale works well mainly because of a staple of crime fiction – the unlikeable character. Ex-Doctor Solly is so unlikeable you wouldn’t want to buy him a beer, but Solly kept my interested through out.

I did have problems with O’Mara’s and Salzberg’s novellas for different reasons. In “Beaned”, nothing happened in the first several chapters, not few or a couple, but several chapters. As a reader, I need to be grabbed at the beginning and not teased with something that may or may not happen in the future. “The Fifth Column” uses the a crime fiction trope usually found in police procedurals or detective stories – I call it the gut trope. The gut trope is one where the protagonist, against all logic, follows a path to a crime and its criminals that no one would have thought of. I’m not a huge fan of the gut trope, but if you are an aficionado of police procedurals, you will probably enjoy Salzberg’s novella.


This review was part of a blog tour. To see other reviews of “Third Degree” click here.

Categories
Incident Report

Incident Report No. 93

I’m on vacation in the land of the Hatfields and McCoys. Cell phone connectivity is non-existent and wi-fi is spotty at best. This is my last post this week, except a review that will magically get posted on Friday.


Articles

Flash Bang Mysteries is soon to be no more.

Michael Cannell gives us a brief tour of New York gangster nightclubs of the 1920s.

Interview with Michael Pool, author of the Riley Reeves mystery series

On the importance of Richard Wright’s “Native Son”.

Interview with crime fiction editor Jim Thomsen.

Austin Camacho interviews Ian K. Smith, author of “The Unspoken” (Thomas & Mercer; 2020).

Alison Stine, author of “Road Out of Winter” (MIRA Books!; 2020) interviewed on the Unlikeable Female Characters podcast.

Jenny Bhatt on the art of literary criticism.

Six Ridiculous Questions: Lee Matthew Goldberg at Vol. 1 Brooklyn.

Pat Kinsella on the problem with exporting America’s writing programs at the Chronicle of Higher Education.

The First Two Pages: “All Shook Down” by Libby Cudmore at Art Taylor’s blog.

Interview with Jeremy Robert Johnson, author of “The Loop” (Saga Press; 2020) at LitReactor.

At The Times Literary Supplement, “Taken at the flood How Agatha Christie moved with her times” by Laura Thompson.

Charles Pappas of the death of Bad Girls in movies at Retreat From Oblivion.

The Los Angeles Review of Books has put together a small anthology, “The Banned Book Reader”. It’s available for a donation as small as $1.


Stories and Poetry

New short fiction by Bobby Mathews at All Due Respect.

New flash fiction from Mark McConville at Bristol Noir.

New short story by Joe Kilgore at Close to the Bone.

New short fiction by Lucy Zhang.

New short fiction by Gabriel Hart at Bristol Noir.

“The Gravitational Constant”, a short story by Bill Gillard.

“Crucial”, a poem by Susan Tepper.

“The Man from Goldman Sachs” by Preston Lang, flash fiction at Pulp Modern.

Short fiction from Paul D. Brazill, “Everyday People”.

“A Bachelor’s Guide To Everything”, a poem by John Patrick Robbins at Punk Noir Magazine.

“A Rotten Plan” by Morgan Boyd, short fiction at Punk Noir Magazine.

The Quietus looks back at Radiohead’s “Kid A” which turned 20.

Short fiction by Phebe Jewell at Fictive Dream.

“Men In the Moon”, short fiction by Mary B. Sellers.

“His Last Vignette”, a poem by Mark Tulin at The Rye Whiskey Review

“Hex Boyfriend” by Andrea Smith, a short story at Close To The Bone.

“Shot Three Times” by Terry Dawley, poetry at The Fifty-Two.

Peter Derk on the joys and sorrows of loving obscure books.

“An Algorithm for Murder” by Michael A. Raithel, short fiction at Shotgun Honey.


Reviews

Review of Lisa Unger’s “Confessions on the 7:45” (Harlequin; 2020) at BOLO Books.

Review of Maryse Meijer’s “The Seventh Mansion” (FSG; 2020).

Review of “Slow Bear” by Anthony Neil Smith (Fahrenheit Press; 2020) at Econoclash Review.

Review of “The Island” by Ben McPherson (Harper Collins; 2020) at BOLO Books.”

Review of “Culture in the Third Reich” by Moritz Föllmer, translated by Jeremy Noakes and Lesley Sharpe (Oxford; 2020).

Review of “Bank Blogger” by Jeffrey Frye (Murder Slim Press; 2020) at Col’s Criminal Library.

Review of “The Familiar Dark” by Amy Engel (Dutton; 2020) at Black Guys Do Read.

Review of “The Night Drop” by Ian D. Wright (2020) at Col’s Criminal Library.


Podcasts and Other Media

Hari Kunzru interviewed on The New York Times Book Review podcast.

Film Noir posters from aroud the world.

“Times Square”: A Forgotten Punk And New Wave Movie Soundtrack Turns 40.

Album review of Brent Cobb’s “Keep ‘Em On They Toes”.

Photographs by Lawrence & Lothar Stelter at Fragments of Noir.

More illustrations focusing on “Dirty Femmes” at Fragments of Noir

Review of “Mad at the World: A Life of John Steinbeck” by William Souder (Norton; 2020)

Review of Netflix’s “American Murder”, their latest true crime documentary.

Why “Miller’s Crossing” Is the Best Coen Brothers Movie

The Big Lonely City photography series continues at Fragments of Noir.

K A Laity reviews “The Long Goodbye” (1973) at Punk Noir Magazine.

Interview with David Gaughran about author promotion at The Creative Penn Podcast.

Andrew Nette continues his series Parker on the Screen with “Slayground” (1983).


Categories
Links

Flash Bang Mysteries, Lucy Zhang, and Jon Bassoff

Jon Bassoff is out with a new book, “Captain Clive’s Dreamworld (Eraserhead Press; 2020). I’m a few chapters in, and wow.

Austin Camacho interviews Ian K. Smith, author of “The Unspoken” (Thomas & Mercer; 2020).

Flash Bang Mysteries is soon to be no more.

Interview with crime fiction editor Jim Thomsen.

Interview with Michael Pool, author of the Riley Reeves mystery series

Review of Maryse Meijer’s “The Seventh Mansion” (FSG; 2020).

New short fiction by Lucy Zhang.

Categories
Links

Dystopia, Miller’s Crossing, and Joe Clifford

Joe Clifford‘s new book “The Lakehouse” is out at Polis Books.

Review of “Slow Bear” by Anthony Neil Smith (Fahrenheit Press; 2020) at Econoclash Review.

New short fiction by Gabriel Hart at Bristol Noir.

Alison Stine, author of “Road Out of Winter” (MIRA Books!; 2020) interviewed on the Unlikeable Female Characters podcast.

Review of “Culture in the Third Reich” by Moritz Föllmer, translated by Jeremy Noakes and Lesley Sharpe (Oxford; 2020).

Jenny Bhatt on the art of literary criticism.

Why “Miller’s Crossing” Is the Best Coen Brothers Movie

Categories
Links

Cro-Magnons, Conspiracy Theory, and Johnny Shaw

“The Southland” by Johnny Shaw (Agora Books; 2020)

Six Ridiculous Questions: Lee Matthew Goldberg at Vol. 1 Brooklyn.

Pat Kinsella on the problem with exporting America’s writing programs at the Chronicle of Higher Education.

At The Times Literary Supplement, “Taken at the flood: How Agatha Christie moved with her times” by Laura Thompson.

Interview with Jeremy Robert Johnson, author of “The Loop” (Saga Press; 2020) at LitReactor.

“Hex Boyfriend”, short fiction by Andrea Smith at Close To The Bone.

The Big Lonely City photography series continues at Fragments of Noir.

Categories
Links

Bad Girls, Rotten Plans, and Coast to Coast Noir

“Coast to Coast Noir” edited by Andrew McAleer and Paul D. Marks (Down & Out Books; 2020).

Charles Pappas of the death of Bad Girls in movies at Retreat From Oblivion.

“The Man from Goldman Sachs” by Preston Lang, flash fiction at Pulp Modern.

“A Rotten Plan” by Morgan Boyd, short fiction at Punk Noir Magazine.

“An Algorithm for Murder” by Michael A. Raithel, short fiction at Shotgun Honey.

Andrew Nette continues his series Parker on the Screen with “Slayground” (1983).

Categories
Incident Report

Incident Report No. 92

Here are several sites that I go to on a regular basis to get a run down of crime fiction news and reviews. You should too.

Kevin’s Corner, which luck has it is run by a Kevin, specifically KevinTipple is an indispensable website if you follow crime fiction. Kevin covers all sorts of crime fiction on his website and it should be a daily stop for you.

Next up is dru’s book musings by Dru Ann Love. It focuses more on the cozy side of the tracks but police procedurals and psychological thrillers make the presence known.

J. Kingston Pierce’s The Rap Sheet is also an important website to visit regularly. Pierce also runs Killer Covers, which focuses on, you guessed it, book covers.

Another important crime news and reviews site is Kristopher Zgorski’s BOLO Books which was received the Raven Award from the Mystery Writers of America in 2018.

Yeah, I know these are all sites based in the US, so I’ve got some work to do next time I post something like this again.


If you haven’t watched “The Social Dilemma” on Netflix, please do so. A lot of what is covered is stuff we already know, specifically we all live in a social media bubble, but there are some scary tidbits. Though the documentary peters out towards the end as it tries to wrap everything in a nice red bow, it’s still worth the 94 minutes of your life. I also wasn’t a fan with after-school special style of the docudrama that was interspersed throughout the more important interviews, but I get it – maybe that’s an effective way to get the message out to more people.

The big takeaway that we all tend to forget as we scroll through our social media addictions is that these companies are selling our attention to advertisers as well as manipulating what we see.

We are the product.