Categories
Incident Report

Incident Report No. 99

Photo by Khoa Võ from Pexels

Features

Gabino Iglesias on the crime writing of Paco Ignacio Taibo II at CrimeReads.

“Why Is Publishing So White?” by Richard Jean So and Gus Wezerek at The New York Times.

Interview with Ron Rash, author of “In the Valley”, at Southern Review of Books.

Jay Wilburn live-streamed writing 50,000 words during NaNoWriMo.

KKUURRTT and Tex Gresham chat about Jocelyn DeBoer and Dawn Luebbe’s film “Greener Gass” at Babou 691.

Interview with Erika T. Wurth, author of “Buckskin Cocaine” (Astrophil Press, 2017) at Full Stop.

Tom Quiller, author of “Evergreen” (Dream Paladin Books, 2020), is interviewed by John Wisniewski at Punk Noir Magazine.

“The Long, Dark Legacy of William Hjortsberg’s Supernatural Neo-Noirs” by Andrew Nette at CrimeReads.

Interview with cartoonist Berkeley Breathed, creator of “Bloom County”, at The New York Times.

Interview with crime fiction master Janet Evanovich at CrimeReads.

Brian Morton on the politics of cultural appropriation at Dissent Magazine.

A fantastic essay in The New York Times by Ligaya Mishan, “The Long and Tortured History of Cancel Culture”.

Gabino Iglesias on agents, can’t live with them, can’t stuff them in a sack.

Everyone has a different journey to writing, and Chris Whitaker’s path was certainly odd.

Some new short story collections via Chicago Review of Books.

A short interview with Andrzej Sapkowski, the mind behind “The Witcher”, at Literary Hub.

CrimeReads presents us with a 1965 TV interview with John le Carré.

There’s some much juiciness in Joanna Scutts’s The Times Literary Supplement essay on self-help books and their relationship to literary criticism.

An appreciation of Alison Lurie at the Los Angeles Times.

Electric Lit’s Favorite Short Story Collections of 2020

Part II of LitReactor’s Best of 2020.

Taking a test spin of the Netflix of Books, BingeBooks.

Interview with Les Edgerton, author of “Hard Times” (Bronzeville Books, 2020).

Interview with science fiction master Kim Stanley Robinson at Los Angeles Review of Books.

The First Two Pages: “When the Wind Is Southerly” by Leone Ciporin at Art Taylor, Writer.

What the pandemic could mean to Arts in the United States.

Interview Judith Levine and Erica R. Meiners, authors of “The Feminist and the Sex Offender”, who talk about the history of the sex offender registry and explore how we can strive to reduce sexual harm without mass incarceration.

Longreads Best of 2020: Crime Reporting.

Quite a few stories and poems were released on Hypnopmp.

Reviews

Review of “The Wingspan of Severed Hands” by Joanna Koch (Weirdpunk Books, 2020) at Babou 691.

Kevin Tipple reviews “All Due Respect 2020” edited by Chris Rhatigan and yours truly.

Review of “The Aosawa Murders” by Riku Onda, translated by Alison Watts (Bitter Lemon Press, 2020)

Ian Ayris reviews “The Art of Serial Killing” by Mark Ramsden (Fahrenheit 13, 2015).

Review of “The Ancient Hours” by Michael Bible (Melville House, 2020) at Vol. 1 Brooklyn.

Review of “Saying Uncle” by Greg Gifune (2008) at Black Guys Do Read.

Scott Alderberg reviews of “Loveloid” by J.L. Morin (Harvard Square Editions, 2020) at Do Some Damage.

Fiction

New fiction from Daniel Torday at Guernica.

New flash fiction by Max Thrax at Bristol Noir.

New fiction by Phil Hurst at Punk Noir Magazine.

Bristol Noir presents us with new disturbing flash fiction from William R. Soldan.

New fiction from Bryan Costales at Close to the Bone.

Bristol Noir has new fiction from C.W. Blackwell.

New fiction by Rosemary McLean at Tough.

New flash fiction by Ted Flanagan at Shotgun Honey.

New fiction by Mark McConville at Bristol Noir.

New fiction from David Summers at Close to the Bone.

Fiction from Paul D. Brazill.

New fiction by Stephen J. Golds.

New flash fiction from Jeff Esterholm at Pulp Modern.

New fiction by Ian Ayris at Punk Noir Magazine.

Poetry

New poetry by Sharon Waller Knutson at The Five-Two.

Review of Alex Balgiu and Mónica de la Torre’s “Women in Concrete Poetry: 1959–1979” at BOMB Magazine.

New poetry by J.J. Campbell at The Rye Whiskey Review

New poetry by Ian Lewis Copestick at Punk Noir Magazine.

New poetry by Timothy Gager at Live Nude Poems.

New poetry by Brian Rihlmann at The Rye Whiskey Review.

New poetry from Luis Cuauhtemoc Berriozabal at The Rye Whiskey Review,

Punk Noir Magazine has new poetry from John Patrick Robbins.

New poetry by Scott Ferry.

Louise Glück’s Nobel Lecture.

New poetry by Lisa Reynolds at The Rye Whiskey Review.

Podcasts

Frank Zafiro interviews TK Thorne, author of “House of Rose” (Camel Press, 2020) at Wrong Place, Write Crime.

Interview with Christopher Golden, author of Red Hands (2020) at Ink Heist.

Film and TV

Nick Kolakowski thinks that “The Good Thief” might be the best heist movie you’ve never seen.

Growing up watching “Bewitched” and loving Elizabeth Montgomery in “The Legend of Lizzie Borden”, I’m interested in watching the TV movie “Mrs. Sundance” (1974) that was reviewed by David Cranmer in Western Fictioneers.

That’s a hell-a lotta words about Goodfellas.

The Babou 691 interview with Chris Kelso and Laura Lee Bahr, screenwriters of the short film, “Strange Bird”.

Music

New music from Sturgill Simpson.

Ambient composer Harold Budd has died.

Best Southern Albums of 2020 from The Bitter Southerner.

The importance of the “O Brother, Where Art Thou” soundtrack 20 years later.

Art and Photography

Photography of Joan Colom at Fragments of Noir.

Fragments of Noir presents more photographs by Roger Schall.

The Dirty Femmes series continues at Fragments of Noir.

Books

Jason Parent’s “Eight Cylinders” (Crystal Lake Publishing, 2020) is out.

Scott Grand’s “The Girl with the Stone Heart” (All Due Respect, 2020) is out.

“Damaged Goods”, a short story collection, by J. Travis Grundon (2020).

“Killer, Come Back to Me” by Ray Bradbury (Hard Case Crime, 2020), a collection of crime stories.

All Due Respect is accepting short story submissions. We’d love to publish more stories from women, writers of color, and other marginalized voices. We pay $25 upon publication. Submission guidelines here.

Categories
Incident Report

Incident Report No. 88

“Late Night Decisions”, photograph by J Stimp, CC BY

How did last week go for you? The objectivity of time is losing its battle against the subjective interpretation of time during the quarantine, last week was both fast and slow for me. No prose recap this week, only links collected throughout the week. There are articles, book reviews, assorted other media links, and a few featured books. My one complaint — oh, I have many —, but my one complaint I’ll voice here was my inability to carve out some space to read more short stories. Maybe this week. Maybe not.


Articles

“Roller Derby and Mystery” by A.J. Devlin (Do Some Damage)

“Thrillers Bring The Light” by James Scott Bell (Kill Zone)

“25 Classic But Lesser-Known Crime Novels to Read in Lockdown, From King Dido to the Sam Dean Series” by Sarah Hughes (inews)

https://downandoutbooks.com/bookstore/goldberg-slow-down/

Next stop for S.A. Cosby, the cover of Rolling Stone (Booklist)

“Legendary Paris bookshop reveals reading habits of illustrious clientele” by Alison Flood (The Guardian)

Submissions are open and what the editors are looking for (Longreads)

“‘This Is A Crazy Time, And It’s Okay If You’re Scared’ Says Man Burying Gagged Prisoner Alive” (The Onion)

“How I Hustled Hundreds of Dollars of Free Tacos for the Literary World” by MM Carrigan (Lit Hub)

More on Greil Marcus’s obsession with “The Great Gatsby” (The Baffler)

The First Two Pages: “Limited Liability” by Sarah Weinman (Art Taylor, Writer)

Otto Penzler’s out (The Crime Lady)

The beginnings of volume two is out now (The Exquisite Corpse)

“Murder in My High School” by K.A. Laity (Punk Noir)

Chapters by Ron Earl Phillips, Todd Morr, and Joseph S. Walker (The Exquisite Corpse)

“Robert Stone’s Bad Trips” by Scott Bradfield (The New Republic)

Submissions call for PM Press (Damppebbles)

Colman Keane interview Nigel Bird, author of “Let it Snow” (Col’s Criminal Library)

“Conflict Without Violence: How to Add More Depth To Your Fiction” by Autumn Christian (LitReactor)

“Tales From the Waffle House and other 24/7 Adventures” by Eve Fisher (SleuthSayers)

“A Day in the Life of a Detective” by Garry Rogers (Kill Zone)

I betcha that CrimeReads will continue to publish the old racist (Facebook)


Short Stories

“Against the Grain” by Rob McClure Smith (Tough)


Book Reviews

“Tommy Shakes” by Rob Pierce (All Due Respect Books) (Col’s Criminal Library)

“Rigged” by D.P. Lyle (Oceanview) (Lesa’s Book Critiques)

“The Only Good Indians” by Stephen Graham Jones (Saga Press) (Malcolm Avenue Reviews)

“Done Deal” by Tony Berry (Lume) (Kevin’s Corner)

“Throwing Off Sparks” by Michael Pool (PI Tales) (Kevin’s Corner)

“Cold Water” by Tom Pitts (Down & Out Books) (Criminal Element)

“The Girl in the Video” by Michael David Wilson (Perpetual Motion Machine) (Do Some Damage)

“We Don’t Talk About Her” by Andersen Prunty (Self-Published) (Just A Guy Who Likes To Read)

“A.P.B.” by David Pedneau (Col’s Criminal Library)

Two opposing views of “The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes” by Suzanne Collins (Vox and NPR)

“Sorry for Your Trouble” by Richard Ford (Fiction Writers Review)

“Everything has Teeth” by Jeff Strand (Black Guys Do Read)

“Take Me Apart” By Sara Sligar (MCD) (LA Review of Books)

“Honky Tonk Samurai” by Joe Lansdale (Just A Guy Who Likes To Read)

“Dead Girl Blues” by Lawrence Block (Do Some Damage)

“A Rage at Sea / A Party Every Night” by Lorenz Heller (Bookgasm)


Podcasts

Podcast: “SILO” by Cameron Mount (EconoClash Review)

Podcast: Robin Burcell, ex-cop and writer, interviewed by Frank Zafiro (Wrong Place, Write Crime)

Podcast: Kimberly McCreight, Tom Pitts, Mary Keliikoa (Writer Types)


Other Media

Photographs: Big Lonely City #101 (Fragments of Noir)

Music: Drug dealers put up George Jones reel-to-reel tapes as bail decades ago (Saving Country Music)

TV Review: “The Cry” (BOLO Books)

Illustrations: Thomas Ott (Fragments of Noir)

Music: “Shelved: The Misfits’ 12 Hits From Hell” by Tom Maxwell (Longreads)

Photographs: Mosiac Noir #25 (Fragments of Noir)

Music: “Was 1973 the Greatest Year for Roots Music?” by Amos Perrine (No Depression)


Featured Books

“Raise the Blade” by Tess Makovesky (Amazon)


“Cold Water” by Tom Pitts (Down & Out Books)


“Benediction for a Thief” by LA Sykes (Close to the Bone)


“Slow Bear” by Anthony Neil Smith (Fahrenheit Press)


“A Rage at Sea / A Party Every Night” by Lorenz Heller (Stark House Press)


“Slow Down” by Lee Matthew Goldberg (All Due Respect Books)


Thanks for stopping by to read Incident Report No. 88. If you’d like to read more posts like this, please click here.

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Links

Dead Bodies, Samurais, and Emily Ratajkowski

Small Crimes: Weekend Edition

“Dead Bodies, Samurais, and Emily Ratajkowski – Small Crimes: Weekend Edition” features Joe Clifford, Tom Pitts, Emily Ratajkowski, and much more.

Interview: Joe Clifford sat down with Dana King. (One Bite at a Time)

Interview: Tom Pitts sat down with Colman Keane (Col’s Criminal Library)

Article: Mock Emily Ratajkowski all you want, but at least she’s writing (Lit Hub)

https://downandoutbooks.com/bookstore/goldberg-slow-down/

Article: “Brian Evenson: 8 Tales of Psychological Terror by the Modern Horror Author” by Michael J. Seidlinger (The Line Up)

Article: “The Exquisite Corpse” is updated. Trust me. (The Exquisite Corpse)

Book Review: “Honky Tonk Samurai” by Joe Lansdale (Just A Guy Who Likes To Read)

Book Review: “Dead Girl Blues” by Lawrence Block (Do Some Damage)

Book Review: “A Rage at Sea / A Party Every Night” by Lorenz Heller (Bookgasm)

Book: “Slow Down” by Lee Matthew Goldberg (All Due Respect Books)

Thanks for stopping by and reading “Dead Bodies, Samurais, and Emily Ratajkowski”. For more Small Crimes, click here.

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Links

Home Invasion, Roller Derby, and George Jones

Small Crimes: Monday Reads

“Home Invasion, Roller Derby, and George Jones – Small Crimes: Monday Reads” features Rob Pierce, Tess Makovesky, Stephen Graham Jones, and more.

Article: “Incident Report No. 87” comes at you with Chris Rhatigan on writing short stories, Max Booth III on trigger warnings, lots of Dana King, and much more. (Unlawful Acts)

Article: “Roller Derby and Mystery” by A.J. Devlin (Do Some Damage)

Article: “Thrillers Bring The Light” by James Scott Bell (Kill Zone)

Listicle: “25 Classic But Lesser-Known Crime Novels to Read in Lockdown, From King Dido to the Sam Dean Series” by Sarah Hughes (inews)

https://downandoutbooks.com/bookstore/goldberg-slow-down/

Book Review: “Tommy Shakes” by Rob Pierce (All Due Respect Books) (Col’s Criminal Library)

Book Review: “Rigged” by D.P. Lyle (Oceanview) (Lesa’s Book Critiques)

Book Review: “The Only Good Indians” by Stephen Graham Jones (Saga Press) (Malcolm Avenue Reviews)

Photographs: Big Lonely City #101 (Fragments of Noir)

Music: Drug dealers put up George Jones reel-to-reel tapes as bail decades ago (Saving Country Music)

Book: “Raise the Blade” by Tess Makovesky (Amazon)

Thanks for stopping by Unlawful Acts and reading “Home Invasion, Roller Derby, and George Jones”. For more Small Crimes, click here.

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Incident Report

Incident Report No. 87

Photograph by Dacian Dorca (CC BY)

The Incident Report No. 87 features highlights from the Small Crimes posts I run almost every day. If you don’t have the time to read the daily missives then this might just be for you.


Several months ago, Chris Rhatigan, publisher of All Due Respect Books, asked if I’d like to help out his plan on resurrecting the All Due Respect zine. The idea was simple: we would publish hard-as-nails crime fiction with a touch of drinking money sent to the writers. I was already used to reading a slush pile. Years ago I use to read the slush pile for a literary magazine in Boston but reading so many stories again was definitely eye-opening with what makes or breaks a short story.

Luckily for y’all, over at Do Some Damage, Rhatigan lays down some guidelines that could be followed when writing short stories.

You don’t need a twist to construct a good short story. In fact, one of the most common mistakes I see is writers constructing stories that are built around a twist. In other words, the first three-quarters of the story seems to express, “wait for it, wait for it, the twist is coming!” Every part of a story should be engaging—not just the end. A related problem is that twists are so common that the law of diminishing returns kicks in. I would imagine most readers have seen plenty of twist endings. 

Simple plots that are handled with expert care and focus on a natural progression of events tend to make stronger stories.

Throughout Rhatigan’s “One Approach To Writing Short Stories”, he also recommends some great examples by Tom Pitts, Paul D. Brazill, and Stephen D. Rogers.

https://downandoutbooks.com/bookstore/goldberg-slow-down/


Over at LitReactor, Max Booth III wrote about trigger warnings in horror fiction and, not surprisingly, there’s a lot of carryover to the crime fiction genre.

Imagine the following scenario: You are lounging on the couch wanting nothing more than to chill out with a cool-ass horror book. You are enjoying everything going on in the story until—whoa wait what the absolute fuck suddenly—you’ve come across a random rape scene, and now instead of having a good time you are reliving a past traumatic experience from your own life. Your entire goddamn day is ruined. Replace “rape” with “suicide” and it’s the same outcome. All you can think about now is a lost loved one who took their own life or perhaps the long struggle you faced overcoming personal suicidal ideations. Or, to continue with one more example, imagine reading a book where a young child dies in a gruesome manner soon after losing your own child. No way are you in any mental state to possibly continue reading. Shit like that is very likely to wreck you.

I feel I’m giving this essay short shrift, but it’s quality especially given Booth’s wearing of multiple hats in the horror genre: writer, editor, publisher, reviewer, and fan.


The fifth book of Dana King’s Penns River series, “Pushing Water” (Down & Out Books), recently came out, and King has been busy. There’s his Do Some Damage article about writing police procedurals which is quite informative.

It bothers me that so many people think what they “learn” in cop and courtroom novels and shows are how things really are. It creates unhealthy ideas of how law enforcement works, or doesn’t. To feel one has to choose between realism and entertainment is a door to lazy writing. There’s no reason the story can’t be both.

Then King’s off to be interviewed by Dietrich Kalteis at Off the Cuff.

I read cop memoirs to get an idea of how they think. I still leaf through Connie Fletcher’s books of cops’ stories. Adam Plantinga’s books 400 Things Cops Know and Police Craft are wonderful resources. Ask some cops how cases get solved and they’ll tell you it’s usually because someone talks.

But wait there’s more!

King interviewed Tom Pitts on the eve of his upcoming release Cold Water (Down & Out Books). Pitts talked about his new book.

I think the Everyman facing insurmountable odds is a powerful theme, and very relatable. I wanted to write something akin to Joe Lansdale’s Hot in December or Cold in July, but my own version. And in Northern California. And I wanted it to play out in a few locations, not just San Francisco. I think the suburban sprawl is under-represented in fiction. Gentrification has made the big cities so banal. Where’s the hunger, where’s the struggle, where’s the passion? In the burbs, baby.


Other Articles

Adam Scovell on reading crime fiction during the pandemic (3:AM Magazine)

Alex George on letting it all burn, “Why Do Some Writers Burn Their Work” (Lit Hub)

“The Comprehensive Guide to Finding, Hiring, and Working with an Editor” by Chantel Hamilton (Jane Friedman)

“Author Spotlight: Andrew Davie” by Scott Cumming (Eight Million Books to Read)

Rachel Howzell Hall and Alex Segura discussed crime fiction (Writer’s Digest)

“The Origins of Scandinavian Noir” by Wendy Lesser (The Paris Review)


Book Reviews

“This Letter to Norman Court” by Pabo D’Stair (All Due Respect Books) (Col’s Criminal Library)

“Love is a Grift” by Graham Wynd (Fox Spirit Books) (Sonia Kilvington)

“We Need To Do Something” by Max Booth III (Perpetual Motion Machine) (Dead End Follies)

“Dead Man’s Mistress” by David Housewright (Minotaur) (Kevin’s Corner)

“Blacktop Wasteland” by S.A. Cosby (Flatiron) (So Much To Talk About)

“Sordid: Five Crime Stories” by Harry Hunsicker (Kevin’s Corner)

“Broken Dreams” by Nick Quantrill (Fahrenheit Press) (Ian Ayris)

“The Waiting Rooms” by Eve Smith (Orenda Books) (Crime Fiction Lover)

“Rock and a Hard Place Issue #2” (Eight Million Books to Read)


Featured Books

“Shotgun Honey Presents Volume 4: Recoil” edited by Ron Earl Phillips (Shotgun Honey)


“Throwing Off Sparks” by Michael Pool (PI Tales)


“The Good Book: Fairy Tales for Hard Men” by Tom Leins (All Due Respect Books)


“We Need To Do Something” by Max Booth III (Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing)


“Nightmare Asylum and other Deadly Delights” by Sonia Kilvington (Close to the Bone)


“The Brooklyn Trilogy” by Robert J. Randisi (Down & Out Books)


Thanks for stopping by to read Incident Report No. 87. If you’d like to read more posts like this, please click here.

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Links

Trigger Warnings, Nightmares, and Writing

Small Crimes: Friday Reads

Nightmare Asylum and Other Deadly Delights by Sonia Kilvington | trigger warnings nightmares writing

Article: “Let’s Talk About Trigger Warnings” by Max Booth III (LitReactor)

Article: “One Approach To Writing Short Stories” by Chris Rhatigan (Do Some Damage)

Article: “Publisher Profile: How Three Rooms Press Operates” (Forbes)

Book Review: “The Waiting Rooms” by Eve Smith (Orenda Books) (Crime Fiction Lover)

Zine Review: “Rock and a Hard Place Issue #2” (Eight Million Books to Read)

Videos: “Celebrating Saul Bass’s centenary: 10 essential title sequences” (BFI)

Book: “Nightmare Asylum and other Deadly Delights” by Sonia Kilvington (Close to the Bone)

Thanks for stopping by and reading

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Cops, Editors, and Hard Men

Small Crimes for Wednesday

Cops, Editors, and Hard Men | "The Good Book: Fairy Tales for Hard Men" by Tom Leins (All Due Respect Books)

“Cops, Editors, and Hard Men: Small Crimes for Wednesday” features Andrew Davie, Dana King, A.J. Devlin, Tom Leins, All Due Respect, and EconoClash Review.

Article: “Author Spotlight: Andrew Davie” by Scott Cumming (Eight Million Books to Read)

Article: Dana King on writing cops (Do Some Damage)

Article: “The Comprehensive Guide to Finding, Hiring, and Working with an Editor” by Chantel Hamilton (Jane Friedman)

Book Review: “Rolling Thunder” by A.J. Devlin (NeWest Press) (Lesa’s Book Critiques)

Photographs: Mosiac Noir #24 (Fragments of Noir)

Podcast: “Recompense” by William R. Soldan (EconoClash Review)

Book: “The Good Book: Fairy Tales for Hard Men” by Tom Leins (All Due Respect Books)

Thanks for stopping by Unlawful Acts and reading “Cops, Editors, and Hard Men”. For more Small Crimes, click here.

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Books

Time, Violence, and Council Estates

“Time, Violence, and Council Estates” features links about our relationship to time, growing up as a child of a cop, book reviews, interviews, etc.

Interview: Dr. Adrian Bardon, a philosopher of time, on why time feels so right now (Vox)

News: Oh, for fuck’s sake (Lit Hub)

Essay: Kylie Logan, author of “The Secrets of Bones”, on growing up as a child of a police officer (Criminal Element)

Book Review: “All Things Violent” by Nikki Dolson (Fahrenheit Press) (Do Some Damage)

Book Review: “Nightmare Asylum and Other Deadly Delights” by Sonia Kilvington (Close to the Bone) (Messy Business)

Photographs: Daniel Frasnay (Fragments of Noir)

Book: “Tales from The Longcroft Estate” by Darren Sant (Close to the Bone)

Thanks for stopping by Unlawful Acts and reading “Time, Violence, and Council Estates”. For more Small Crimes, click here.

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Links

Cops, Canada, Mistakes

Small Crimes: Wednesday Reads

Bleak Friday | Canada, Cops, Mistakes

“Canada, Cops, Mistakes” features Jennifer Hillier, Hannah Mary McKinnon, Roz Nay, Robyn Harding, Elena Taylor, Michael Pool, Paul J. Garth, and more.

Roundtable: Canadian Women Writers Talk Crime Fiction (The Thrill Begins)

Interview: James L’Etoile talked to Elena Taylor, author of “All We Buried” (Crooked Lane Press) (Do Some Damage)

Article: Frank Zafiro on being a cop and a writer, and what’s real and what’s not (Criminal Minds)

Article: The First Two Pages: “Cold Blue Steel and Sweet Fire” by Donna Andrews (Art Taylor, Writer)

Short Story: “Paper Boats” by Paul J. Garth (Tough)

Book Review: “Throwing Off Sparks” by Michael Pool (PI Tales) (Criminal Element)

Book Review: “Ash Mountain” by Helen FitzGerald (Orenda Books) (BOLO Books)

Book Review: “Girl Can’t Help It” by Max Allan Collins (Thomas & Mercer) (Bookgasm)

New Release: “Bleak Friday” by Various Artists (King Shot Press)

Thanks for stopping by Unlawful Acts and reading “Canada, Cops, Mistakes”. For more Small Crimes, click here.

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Links

Small Crimes: Tuesday Reads

News: Marietta Miles on book releases and upcoming virtual events (Do Some Damage)

Book Review: “Nightmare Asylum & Other Deadly Delights” by Sonia Kilvington (Close to the Bone) (K.A Laity)

Book Review: “Dirty Old Town” by Gabriel Valjan (Level Best Books) (Jersey Girl Book Reviews)

Essay: “Two Novels, Two Global Catastrophes, Two Decades Apart” by Lee Durkee, author of “The Last Taxi Driver” (Tin House) (Lit Hub)

Article: Bookstore re-openings will be difficult (The New Publishing Standard)

Short Story: “Phillip Marlowe, DoorDash Delivery Guy” by Walter Jones (McSweeney’s)

Photographs: Big Lonely City #98 (Fragments of Noir)

Playlist: Best Western (Spotify)

Zine: Rock and A Hard Place, Issue 2