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Incident Report

Incident Report No. 98

Features

Ever so often, I come across an article that I want to make sure you read. This is one of them. K.A. Laity’s “Folk Horror Noir?” is a fantastic essay weaving through Dorothy Hughes’s “Ride the Pink Horse” (1946), a definition of folk horror noir, and “heteronormative male gaze”.

Here’s a list of “Weird, Bloody, Wonderful Westerns” by Sadie Hartmann.

Adrian McKinty’s essay “The Extraordinary Mind of Philip K. Dick” is well worth your time.

Interview with Stephen Graham Jones at The Rumpus.

J. Kingston Pierce looks at the work of the largely-forgotten Stanley Ellin.

Scott Alderberg on the forgotten pleasure of browsing in a bookstore at Do Some Damage.

The crazy, mixed-up world of Pac Man ripoffs at Babou 691.

Jay Wilburn recommends some writing and creativity books that aren’t the usual suspects one usually comes across at LitReactor.

Thank fucking god, a book list at CrimeReads that doesn’t include “Girl on the Train”, Andrew Shaffer on the 21st-century slasher novel.

I’m including this article solely because of this opening line which piqued my interest, “The Soviet writer Andrei Platonov is a prime example of an author who manages to make his sentences work twice.

The rich love them some pedophilia even in literary France.

Some interesting picks for the best books of 2020 at LitReactor.

Holiday horrors at Electric Literature.

“The Best Southern Books of December 2020” from, you guessed it, the Southern Review of Books.

Matt Paust has some thoughts on Robert Coover’s short story, “You Must Remember This”.

The First Two Pages: “The Rock Star” by Frances Aylor at Art Taylor’s bog.

Interview with John Copenhaver, author of “Dodging and Burning”, at Tara Laskowki.

New Noir City magazine is out.

NPR’s Best Books Of 2020 is out. A better list of “best of” mystery books would be hard to find.


Reviews

Review of “Matthew Henson and the Ice Temple of Harlem” by Gary Phillips (Agora Books, 2020) at Pulp Fiction Reviews.

Review of Jonathan Lethem’s “The Arrest” (Ecco, 2020) in the Sonora Review.

Review of “The Dark Earth of Albion” by Gareth Spark (Plastic Brain Press, 2020) at Tom Leins’s Dirty Books.

Review of Andrew Davie’s “Dig Two Graves” (Close to the Bone, 2020) at Bristol Noir.

Review of “Love, Kurt: The Vonnegut Love Letters, 1941–1945” edited by Edith Vonnegut (Random House, 2020)

Review of “Beyond the Truth” by Bruce Robert Coffin (Witness Impulse, 2018) at Kevin’s Corner.

Review of “The Tease” by Gil Brewer (1967) at Rough Edges.

Review of “The Silence” by Don DeLillo (Scribner, 2020) at the Los Angeles Review of Books

Review of “Blind Vigil” by Matt Coyle (Oceanview Publishing, 2020) at BOLO Books.

Review of “Pulp Reality 1: Action & Adventure Publication” edited by Charles Millhouse (Stormgate Press, 2020).

Review of “The Searcher” by Tana French at the Los Angeles Review of Books.


Fiction

One of my side gigs is working as an editor for the monthly All Due Respect ‘zine. We released some new fiction by BV Lawson. Y’all should go read it now.

New flash fiction by David Nemeth, editor of this blog, at Punk Noir Magazine.

New fiction from ACF Wilson at Punk Noir Magazine.

New fiction – Welsh Christmas crime fiction – by Eamonn Griffin at Crime Cymru.

New fiction by Jim Woessner at Close to the Bone.

New flash fiction by Ian Ayris at Bristol Noir.

New fiction by Mark McConville at Punk Noir Magazine.

New fiction from Kieran Shea at Shotgun Honey.

New fiction from Dylan H. Jones at Punk Noir Magazine.

The fiction by Blake Johnson at Bristol Noir.

New fiction by L.P. Ring at Close to the Bone.

New flash fiction from Curtis Ippolito at Pulp Modern.

New fiction by Andrew Davie at Bristol Noir.

New fiction by Paul Beckman at Fictive Dream.

New fiction by David Tromblay at Bristol Noir.

New flash fiction by Brooks Mendell at Mystery Tribune.

New issue of The Molotov Cocktail is out and features Rebecca N. McKinnon, Tamara Rogers, and Hannah Hoare.

New fiction by Mike Zone at Punk Noir Magazine.

New flash fiction from Tim Craig at Ellipsis Zine.

New fiction by Tita Chico at Vol. 1 Brooklyn.

New fiction from Paul D. Brazill.

New flash fiction by Kip Knott at Flash Fiction Magazine.


Poetry

New poetry by Angelina Mitescu at The Five-Two.

New poetry by Amy-Jean Muller at Close to the Bone.

New poetry by Jennifer Perrine at The Rumpus.

New poetry from Lauren Scharhag at The Rye Whiskey Review

New poetry by Mark James Andrews at The Rye Whiskey Review.

New poetry by John Patrick Robbins in The Rye Whiskey Review.

New poetry from Ian Lewis Copestick at Punk Noir Magazine.


Podcasts

Tim Waggoner, author of “Writing in the Dark” (Raw Dog Screaming Press, 2020) is interviewed on the Ink Heist podcast.


Film and TV

“Farz” is the first Bollywood spy movie and this sentence from The Cultural Gutter article is why you’ll want to read about it: “I haven’t mentioned the plot yet because it hardly matters.”

Review of “The Lost Adventures of James Bond” by Mark Edlitz (Bowker, 2020) at We Are Cult.


Music

I’ve never heard of this album before, “Money Jungle” by the greats Duke Ellington, Charlie Mingus, and Max Roach. Here’s a review from The Paris Review and here is the album on Spotify.

Dave Alvin on the touring life.

gorilla vs. bear’s albums of 2020.


Art and Photography

Illustrations by Greg Clark at Fragments of Noir.

Photographs by Roger Schall

The Big Lonely City photography series continues at Fragments of Noir.


Books

Come on. With this cover and such a great title, this book deserves to be read. “Deer Shoots Man (then steals his cigarettes)” by Tyler Knight (Fahrenheit Press, 2020) is out now.


The new issue of Rock and a Hard Place is out and features Jay Bechtol, Michael Chin, Barbara DeMarco-Barrett, Laura Dizon, Paul J. Garth, Dan Georgakas, Stephen J. Golds, Bruce Harris, Russell W. Johnson, Wilson Koewing, Diane Krauthamer, Susan Kuchinskas, Jeff Maschi, Jess Messier, Roger Nokes, Andrew Novak, Thomas Pluck, Richard Risemberg, Peter Rozovsky, Jason Mykl Snyman, Stefen Styrsky, N.B. Turner and Jane Young. Holy fuck, that’s a packed issue.


Hoosier Noir: Two, the anthology of Indiana crime stories, has been out for a few days. It features Serena Jayne, Don Stoll, Zakariah Johnson, Michael Bracken, C.W. Blackwell, Stephen J. Golds, Marianne Halber, and Joseph S. Walker.


“My Funny Valentine” by Nigel Bird (Down & Out Book, 2020), the second in The Rat Pack Series, is out.


“Boinking Bizarro”, a new anthology from Death’s Head Press is out featuring stories by Brian Asman, Danger Slater, John Wayne Comunale, Autumn Christian, Gina Ranalli, Betty Rocksteady, Christine Morgan, John Skipp, Whit Slorp, Cody Goodfellow, Chad Stroup, Charles Austin Muir, Michael Allen Rose, Max Booth III, Lucan Mangum, Chandler Morrison, Amy Vaughn, and Jessica McHugh.


The 13th issue of Switchblade is out. They call themselves “the world’s only no-limit outlaw noir magazine. The issue features Robert Ragan, David Harry Moss, Gene Breaznell, Serena Jayne, Jay Rohr, Brian Beatty, Elliot F. Sweeney, Stanton McCaffery, Danny Sophabmisay, Andrew Bourelle, George Garnet, David Rachels, Alec Cizak, and Serena Jayne.


All Due Respect is accepting short story submissions. We’d love to publish more stories from women, writers of color, and other marginalized voices. We pay $25 upon publication. Submission guidelines here.

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Links

Hoosier Noir, Dorothy Hughes, and Philip K. Dick

Hoosier Noir: Two, the anthology of Indiana crime stories, has been out for a few days. It features Serena Jayne, Don Stoll, Zakariah Johnson, Michael Bracken, C.W. Blackwell, Stephen J. Golds, Marianne Halber, and Joseph S. Walker.

Ever so often, I come across an article that I want to make sure you read. This is one of them. K.A. Laity’s “Folk Horror Noir?” is a fantastic essay weaving through Dorothy Hughes’s “Ride the Pink Horse” (1946), a definition of folk horror noir, and the “heteronormative male gaze”.

Adrian McKinty’s essay “The Extraordinary Mind of Philip K. Dick” is well worth your time.

Here’s a list of “Weird, Bloody, Wonderful Westerns” by Sadie Hartmann.

Interview with Stephen Graham Jones at The Rumpus.

Review of Jonathan Lethem’s “The Arrest” (Ecco, 2020) in the Sonora Review.

New flash fiction by Ian Ayris at Bristol Noir.

All Due Respect is accepting short story submissions. We’d love to publish more stories from women, writers of color, and other marginalized voices. We pay $25 upon publication. Submission guidelines here.

Categories
Incident Report

Incident Report No. 88

“Late Night Decisions”, photograph by J Stimp, CC BY

How did last week go for you? The objectivity of time is losing its battle against the subjective interpretation of time during the quarantine, last week was both fast and slow for me. No prose recap this week, only links collected throughout the week. There are articles, book reviews, assorted other media links, and a few featured books. My one complaint — oh, I have many —, but my one complaint I’ll voice here was my inability to carve out some space to read more short stories. Maybe this week. Maybe not.


Articles

“Roller Derby and Mystery” by A.J. Devlin (Do Some Damage)

“Thrillers Bring The Light” by James Scott Bell (Kill Zone)

“25 Classic But Lesser-Known Crime Novels to Read in Lockdown, From King Dido to the Sam Dean Series” by Sarah Hughes (inews)

https://downandoutbooks.com/bookstore/goldberg-slow-down/

Next stop for S.A. Cosby, the cover of Rolling Stone (Booklist)

“Legendary Paris bookshop reveals reading habits of illustrious clientele” by Alison Flood (The Guardian)

Submissions are open and what the editors are looking for (Longreads)

“‘This Is A Crazy Time, And It’s Okay If You’re Scared’ Says Man Burying Gagged Prisoner Alive” (The Onion)

“How I Hustled Hundreds of Dollars of Free Tacos for the Literary World” by MM Carrigan (Lit Hub)

More on Greil Marcus’s obsession with “The Great Gatsby” (The Baffler)

The First Two Pages: “Limited Liability” by Sarah Weinman (Art Taylor, Writer)

Otto Penzler’s out (The Crime Lady)

The beginnings of volume two is out now (The Exquisite Corpse)

“Murder in My High School” by K.A. Laity (Punk Noir)

Chapters by Ron Earl Phillips, Todd Morr, and Joseph S. Walker (The Exquisite Corpse)

“Robert Stone’s Bad Trips” by Scott Bradfield (The New Republic)

Submissions call for PM Press (Damppebbles)

Colman Keane interview Nigel Bird, author of “Let it Snow” (Col’s Criminal Library)

“Conflict Without Violence: How to Add More Depth To Your Fiction” by Autumn Christian (LitReactor)

“Tales From the Waffle House and other 24/7 Adventures” by Eve Fisher (SleuthSayers)

“A Day in the Life of a Detective” by Garry Rogers (Kill Zone)

I betcha that CrimeReads will continue to publish the old racist (Facebook)


Short Stories

“Against the Grain” by Rob McClure Smith (Tough)


Book Reviews

“Tommy Shakes” by Rob Pierce (All Due Respect Books) (Col’s Criminal Library)

“Rigged” by D.P. Lyle (Oceanview) (Lesa’s Book Critiques)

“The Only Good Indians” by Stephen Graham Jones (Saga Press) (Malcolm Avenue Reviews)

“Done Deal” by Tony Berry (Lume) (Kevin’s Corner)

“Throwing Off Sparks” by Michael Pool (PI Tales) (Kevin’s Corner)

“Cold Water” by Tom Pitts (Down & Out Books) (Criminal Element)

“The Girl in the Video” by Michael David Wilson (Perpetual Motion Machine) (Do Some Damage)

“We Don’t Talk About Her” by Andersen Prunty (Self-Published) (Just A Guy Who Likes To Read)

“A.P.B.” by David Pedneau (Col’s Criminal Library)

Two opposing views of “The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes” by Suzanne Collins (Vox and NPR)

“Sorry for Your Trouble” by Richard Ford (Fiction Writers Review)

“Everything has Teeth” by Jeff Strand (Black Guys Do Read)

“Take Me Apart” By Sara Sligar (MCD) (LA Review of Books)

“Honky Tonk Samurai” by Joe Lansdale (Just A Guy Who Likes To Read)

“Dead Girl Blues” by Lawrence Block (Do Some Damage)

“A Rage at Sea / A Party Every Night” by Lorenz Heller (Bookgasm)


Podcasts

Podcast: “SILO” by Cameron Mount (EconoClash Review)

Podcast: Robin Burcell, ex-cop and writer, interviewed by Frank Zafiro (Wrong Place, Write Crime)

Podcast: Kimberly McCreight, Tom Pitts, Mary Keliikoa (Writer Types)


Other Media

Photographs: Big Lonely City #101 (Fragments of Noir)

Music: Drug dealers put up George Jones reel-to-reel tapes as bail decades ago (Saving Country Music)

TV Review: “The Cry” (BOLO Books)

Illustrations: Thomas Ott (Fragments of Noir)

Music: “Shelved: The Misfits’ 12 Hits From Hell” by Tom Maxwell (Longreads)

Photographs: Mosiac Noir #25 (Fragments of Noir)

Music: “Was 1973 the Greatest Year for Roots Music?” by Amos Perrine (No Depression)


Featured Books

“Raise the Blade” by Tess Makovesky (Amazon)


“Cold Water” by Tom Pitts (Down & Out Books)


“Benediction for a Thief” by LA Sykes (Close to the Bone)


“Slow Bear” by Anthony Neil Smith (Fahrenheit Press)


“A Rage at Sea / A Party Every Night” by Lorenz Heller (Stark House Press)


“Slow Down” by Lee Matthew Goldberg (All Due Respect Books)


Thanks for stopping by to read Incident Report No. 88. If you’d like to read more posts like this, please click here.

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Songbirds, Snakes, and Bodies

Small Crimes: Thursday Reads

Slow Beary by Anthony Neil Smith | Songbirds, Snakes, and Bodies

“Songbirds, Snakes, and Bodies – Small Crimes: Thursday Edition” features The Exquisite Corpse, K.A. Laity, Robin Bercell, Anthony Neil Smith, and more.

Article: The beginnings of volume two is out now (The Exquisite Corpse)

Article: “Murder in My High School” by K.A. Laity (Punk Noir)

Book Review: “A.P.B.” by David Pedneau (Col’s Criminal Library)

Book Review: Two opposing views of “The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes” by Suzanne Collins (Vox and NPR)

Book Review: “Sorry for Your Trouble” by Richard Ford (Fiction Writers Review)

https://downandoutbooks.com/bookstore/goldberg-slow-down/

Podcast: Robin Burcell, ex-cop and writer, interviewed by Frank Zafiro (Wrong Place, Write Crime)

Photographs: Mosiac Noir #25 (Fragments of Noir)

Music: “Was 1973 the Greatest Year for Roots Music?” by Amos Perrine (No Depression)

Book: “Slow Bear” by Anthony Neil Smith (Fahrenheit Press)

Thanks for stopping by Unlawful Acts and reading “Songbirds, Snakes, and Bodies”. For more Small Crimes, click here.

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Links

Delinquents, Reading, and Finding Bodies

Throwing Off Sparks by Michael Pool  | Delinquents, Reading, and Finding Bodies

“Delinquents, Reading, and Finding Bodies” features Rachel Howzell Hall, Alex Segura, the problem with reading in a pandemic, book reviews, and much more.

Conversation: Rachel Howzell Hall and Alex Segura discussed crime fiction (Writer’s Digest)

Article: A neuroscientist on why it may be difficult for you to read (Vox)

Short Story: “A World Full of Strangers” by Stephen J. Golds (Bristol Noir)

Book Review: “Love is a Grift” by Graham Wynd (Fox Spirit Books) (Sonia Kilvington)

Book Review: “We Need To Do Something” by Max Booth III (Perpetual Motion Machine) (Dead End Follies)

Book Review: “Dead Man’s Mistress” by David Housewright (Minotaur) (Kevin’s Corner)

Book Review: “Blacktop Wasteland” by S.A. Cosby (Flatiron) (So Much To Talk About)

Film: K.A. Laity watched “The Party’s Over”, directed by Guy Hamilton (Punk Noir)

Photographs: Dave Jordano (Fragments of Noir)

Book: “Throwing Off Sparks” by Michael Pool (PI Tales)

Thanks for stopping by Unlawful Acts and reading “Delinquents, Reading, and Finding Bodies.: For more Small Crimes, click here.

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Incident Report

Incident Report No. 86

Photograph by J. Stimp, CC BY

The Incident Report No. 86 features highlights from the Small Crimes posts I run almost every day. If you don’t have the time to read the daily missives then this might just be for you.


The week began well for Shawn Cosby. There was an interview in Publishers Weekly and he made the cover of Booklist, a book review journal published by the American Library Association. Everything was coming up Cosby. But as Eryk Pruitt pointed out, “Book Twitter is why we can’t have nice things.”

The short of it is that a Twitter Mob formed and resulted in Booklist pulling their cover. Please read Cosby’s response.

Again, I am a 46-year-old black man who lives in the former capitol of the Confederacy. I understand that images matter and can be used to reinforce negative ideas. But I feel, no I pray that we, each of us, will do our best to slough off the shackles of our preconceived notions. That we will take time to ask ourselves why is it that when we see the words “crime fiction’ and the image of a black man we didn’t assume he was the hero? 


Adrian Bardon, author of “A Brief History of the Philosphy of Time”, was interviewed for Vox to discuss how the quarantine is affecting our perception of time.

You mentioned this kind of paradoxical thing: We feel that time is dragging, but it’s also flying by. That comes out of the same situation. We’re out of our routine. We’re out of our structure. We’re out of doing tasks that we would normally feel productive and good about. It’s more like we’re treading water or trying to deal with situations we don’t want to deal with. And then in our retrospective judgment of the passage of time, it seems like things went by really quickly because we didn’t really accomplish anything.


Here are the first paragraphs of two short stories that deserve your attention: K.A. Laity’s “The Click of the Shutting” (Punk Noir) and Paul J. Garth’s “Paper Boats” (Tough).

She waited for the sound of it, the sound that meant safety, the sound that meant it was over for now. The time it was when his shouts might soften, sometimes even turn to tears and beg forgiveness, beg for comfort, remind her again how it was all her fault.

“The Click of the Shutting” by K.A. Laity (Punk Noir)

They had only been gone a few hours, just long enough to see a movie and pick up some food for the kid, but somehow that’d been long enough for Taylor Olsen to die, the boy still strapped to the metal folding chair Neil had tied him to before they left, his face blue, his little clenched mouth filled with vomit.

“Paper Boats” by Paul J. Garth (Tough)

Garry Rodgers, author of “From the Shadows”, wrote “What Really Goes On In The Morgue” (Kill Zone). He also peppered his story with anectodes from his law enforcement career.

One was “Mister Red Pepper Paste Man”. My friend Elvira Esikanian, a seasoned forensic pathologist of Bosnian descent who cut her teeth by exhuming mass graves, is a gem. She also has a wicked eye for detail.

I brought this old guy into the morgue after finding him dead in his apartment. Neighbors reported him screaming like someone was skinning a live cat. They rushed in and found him collapsed on the floor. No idea what killed him, but no sign of foul play.

Elvira opened his stomach and it was positively crawling. She knew what it was—botulism. Elvira told me to go back to the scene and look to see what he’d been eating. I found it. It was a jar of red pepper paste that was years past its expiry date, and the inside was a mass of organic activity.


Featured Books


“The Faking of the President: Nineteen Stories of White House Noir” edited by Peter Carlaftes (Three Rooms Press)


“Still Life with a Suitcase” by Scott Eubanks (Down & Out Books)


“Bleak Friday” by Various Artists (King Shot Press)


"KIng of the Crows" by Russell Day | Crows, Cliffs, Stephen King

 “King of the Crows” by Russell Day (Fahrenheit Press)


“Tales from The Longcroft Estate” by Darren Sant (Close to the Bone)


“Blacktop Wasteland” by S.A. Cosby (Flatiron)


Thanks for stopping by to read Incident Report No. 86. If you’d like to read more posts like this, please click here.